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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Anything You Say or Do May Be Used in a Story

/, LGBT, Narrative Nonfiction, Writing Tips/Anything You Say or Do May Be Used in a Story

Anything You Say or Do May Be Used in a Story

LGBT

UNABRIDGED event flyer

On Saturday, October 25th my spouse and I attended a Lambda Literary event titled “UNABRIDGED: A Conversation with Ana Castillo, Andrew Holleran, and Justin Torres” at the Armory for the Arts Theater here in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The event consisted of readings from each of the three authors, followed by a discussion with the author panel moderated by Amy Scholder.

real life people as characters?

Alice Darwin (@alicewriterland)

I came away from the event with a greater appreciation for the challenges writers face in navigating the line between fiction and nonfiction when their writing is inspired by real life people. When Amy asked a question about self-censorship in writing, Justin talked about breaking “the cardinal rule of telling family secrets” in his book, even though it was about a fictional family. Andrew commented that culture is moving toward “exposure” and that sometimes the line between fiction and nonfiction is hard to negotiate because “the best characters are the ones you can observe minutely.”

While considering this challenge, I came across a useful article from Writer’s Relief. Here are three excerpts on the topic:

Most fiction is autobiographical to some extent, as writers draw from their real-world experiences. . . . Sometimes a story is created from the tiniest real-life detail.

If you think about the lives of ordinary people, there’s not usually a novel to be had. Real life is messy and complicated and doesn’t follow the rules of fiction; it’s also boring at times. . .mundane. The trick is to lift characters, events, tragedies, and triumphs from the pages of real life and create a new existence for them.

Disguising a real-life story as fiction doesn’t necessarily ensure that you’ll avoid lawsuits. . . . Better to model a character after [a real person]; as a writer, you can improve on the character to better suit your story, and no one will be humiliated.

By | 2017-07-18T08:03:05+00:00 November 3rd, 2014|Fiction, LGBT, Narrative Nonfiction, Writing Tips|0 Comments

About the Author:

Louann's former career was in business, finance, and economics, but she's always loved reading and language. . . so she obtained a specialized copyediting certification and launched a freelance copyediting career. Personally, her favorite genres to read are science fiction & fantasy and mystery. Because she loves language and has this eclectic combination of background and interests, she can copyedit a wide range of materials—everything from academic journal articles to company press releases to time-travel romances. Regardless of the type of writing, her goal is always to ensure that the manuscript reflects the best of the author’s ability and unique voice. She sees the editing process as a collaboration in which she acts as a bridge between the author and the reader.

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